Oldest Evidence of Tobacco Use Found at Ice Age Camp in Utah

Excavations at an Ice Age hunter-gatherer camp in Utah’s Great Salt Lake Desert have revealed the oldest known evidence of tobacco use found so far. The discovery took place at the Wishbone site and was hidden only a few centimeters below the surface. During their excavations researchers discovered a campground used by the prehistoric hunter-gatherers 12,300 years ago. The Oldest Evidence of Tobacco Use in North America The site contains several points of interest including the charred remains of an ancient hearth, a finely crafted spear point, and a collection of tobacco seeds. Archaeologist Daron Duke of Far Western Anthropological Research Group in Henderson, Nev., and colleagues were especially intrigued by the four charred seeds, which they discovered came from wild tobacco plants. Read moreSection: NewsHistory & ArchaeologyRead Later 

Oldest Evidence of Tobacco Use Found at Ice Age Camp in Utah
The Storyteller by Martin Pate

Excavations at an Ice Age hunter-gatherer camp in Utah’s Great Salt Lake Desert have revealed the oldest known evidence of tobacco use found so far.

The discovery took place at the Wishbone site and was hidden only a few centimeters below the surface. During their excavations researchers discovered a campground used by the prehistoric hunter-gatherers 12,300 years ago.

The Oldest Evidence of Tobacco Use in North America

The site contains several points of interest including the charred remains of an ancient hearth, a finely crafted spear point, and a collection of tobacco seeds. Archaeologist Daron Duke of Far Western Anthropological Research Group in Henderson, Nev., and colleagues were especially intrigued by the four charred seeds, which they discovered came from wild tobacco plants.